Tag Archives: vitamin c

Baked Chicken in Artichoke Hearts and Spinach – Paleo and Gluten Free

Baked Chicken in Artichoke Hearts and Spinach – Paleo and Gluten Free

I don’t think I’ve ever liked artichoke hearts as much as I do in the recipe. It took me a really long time to appreciate them just like asparagus. But now like asparagus, I can say I love artichoke hearts.

Artichoke hearts have antioxidants, 9 times more Vitamin C than orange juice or red peppers and 10 grams of soluble fiber per artichoke. Not a bad resume.

baked chicken artichoke heart spinach paleo gluten free low fat onion carrot vitamin c proteinBrowning the chicken in a pan on the stove prior to baking is totally worth it and I think really makes the recipe go from good to kick ass. I used chicken (bone-in) cut into 8 pieces from Trader Joes. Using a very sharp knife, I removed the skins to make it lower in fat. Use 6 – 8 pieces for a family meal but if its just you and your sweety, 4 pieces will be fine. Just halve the rest of the ingredients.

I also made this same dish with boneless, skinless chicken breast and it came out fantastic too. You’ll prepare everything the same but reduce the baking time by about 5 minutes.

baked chicken artichoke heart spinach paleo gluten free low fat onion carrot vitamin c proteinWhile the chicken is browning on the stove (about 7 – 10 minutes on each side), cut up the onions and carrots. Then once the chicken is browned, remove it to a plate and using the same juices in the pan, saute the onions, carrots, artichokes and garlic. After about 5 minutes, the veggies should be softened up. Now add a bag of fresh baby spinach and once it gets good and wilted, pour everything from your pan into your baking dish and pour the broth over the veggies. Now nestle your chicken pieces in the veggies and broth and bake for 20 – 25 minutes (for bone-in) or 15 – 20 minutes (for boneless). Check to see if its done by slicing into the thickest piece and if there’s no pink, you are good to go.

Baked Chicken in Artichoke Hearts and Spinach - Paleo and Gluten Free
 
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Author:
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1 tablespoon grass fed butter
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 - 8 bone-in chicken pieces (thighs, chicken breast, legs) OR 2 - 4 pieces of boneless skinless chicken breasts
  • 2 cans (14-ounces) quartered artichokes, rinsed and drained
  • 1 yellow onion, diced fine
  • 1 red onion, diced fine
  • 1 large carrot, peeled and sliced into thin rounds
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped OR 2 teaspoons minced garlic
  • 1 bag (6 to 8 ounces) fresh baby spinach
  • 1 cup vegetable broth
  • salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 425.
  2. Heat oil and butter in a large pan.
  3. Brown chicken for about 7 - 10 minutes each side until nicely browned.
  4. Remove chicken from pan and set aside on a plate.
  5. Using the same juices saute the onions, carrots, artichokes and garlic for about 5 minutes or until veggies have softened up.
  6. Add bag of fresh baby spinach to the pan and once it gets good and wilty.
  7. Put the veggies in large baking dish and pour the broth over the top.
  8. Nestle your chicken pieces in the veggies and broth and bake for 20 - 25 minutes for bone-in OR 15 - minutes for boneless. Just cut the pieces open to make sure there is no pink before serving. If you need to cook longer than do 5 minute increments at a time so not to overcook.
  9. Serve warm but it reheats really good.

 

 

Baked Spicy Jicama Fries – Better Than French Fries

Baked Spicy Jicama Fries –  Better Than French Fries

jicama vegetable fiber root legume starch salad weight loss diabetic low glycemic

What the mutha-love is JICAMA? Pronounced “HEE-kah-ma”.  Apparently I have been blind to this vegetable. Here is few jicama facts I learned:

  • Technically a legume, grows on vines
  • Texture resembles potato, turnips and water chestnuts
  • Low in calories and carbs
  • Great for diabetic menus because it ranks low on the glycemic index
  • Lots of fiber. Not just any fiber – jicama’s fiber is infused with oligofructose inulin, which has zero calories and doesn’t metabolize in the body into sugar the way potatoes do.
  • Promotes good bacteria in the gut
  • Excellent source of vitamin C
  • Healthy amounts of potassium
  • Contains important vitamins like folates, riboflavin, pyridoxine, pantothenic acid, and thiamin, and the minerals magnesium, copper, iron, and manganese.
  • When purchasing, choose one that is firm with no soft spots or splits.
  • The skin is not edible so use a knife to cut away the skin and the tough fibrous outer layer.

jicama vegetable fiber root legume starch salad weight loss diabetic low glycemic

Ok now that we know the A – Z ‘s of jicama we can get down to the most important piece of information – no-guilt fries and I can use my beloved ketchup!

I HEART KETCHUP SOOOO MUCH

jicama vegetable fiber root legume starch salad weight loss diabetic low glycemic

Eating healthy can have it’s sacrifices but there ARE alternatives. Use jicama instead of potatoes and you have healthy french fries. And a reason to use that red sweet nectar called ketchup 🙂

You can use whatever spice suits your taste too. I love a seasoned fry with heat but you could try lime juice and paprika OR a little salt and pepper OR even try some cinnamon and coconut palm sugar and use organic maple syrup as your condiment for dipping. Just coat your “fries” in melted coconut oil first so that your flavoring sticks.

Baked Spicy Jicama Fries - Better Than French Fries
 
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Author:
Recipe type: Paleo, Vegan, Gluten-Free
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1 medium jicama, peeled and sliced into "fries"
  • 2 tablespoon coconut oil
  • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • ¼ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • ⅛ teaspoon onion powder
  • ⅛ teaspoon paprika
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. In a large bowl, pour melted coconut oil over the sliced jicama fries. With your hands, massage coconut oil into each fry.
  3. In a small bowl, combine salt, pepper, cayenne, onion powder and paprika. Stir to combine.
  4. Toss spices over fries evenly.
  5. Place fries on baking sheet (line with parchment paper or use a non-stick mat).
  6. Bake for 30 - 35 minutes.
  7. Get out your ketchup and eat fries!

 

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Blue Cheese and Honey Figs

Blue Cheese and Honey Figs

fig blue cheese honey fruit fiber potassium sweet nutritious healthy antioxidants

Fresh figs make me all kinds of giddy and happy. Since they are seasonal, I don’t get to eat them as often as I would like. I usually have to wait well into Summer to enjoy my favorite fruit so imagine my surprise and delight when my grocery store had figs already, in late April. I may have squealed aloud in the store – whoops.

I love figs for their sweetness, the quick shot of fiber, high potassium levels, calcium, phosphorus, vitamin C, skin healing properties, etc. Read this little post about all the awesome goodness of the fig. I knew they were healthy but didn’t realize how healthy until I read up on them. 

My favorite fig treat is simple but oh so decadent. Just wash gently, slice into quarters, sprinkle with blue cheese crumbles and drizzle with some organic honey.

fig blue cheese honey fruit fiber potassium sweet nutritious healthy antioxidants

Blue Cheese and Honey Figs
 
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Blue Cheese and Honey Figs
Author:
Recipe type: Dessert
Serves: 1
Ingredients
  • 2 fresh figs
  • 1½ tablespoon blue cheese crumbles
  • 1 tablespoon organic honey
Instructions
  1. Gently wash and dry figs.
  2. Quarter figs.
  3. Sprinkle with blue cheese crumbles.
  4. Drizzle with honey.
  5. Prepare to make your mouth happy.

 

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Red and Orange Bell Pepper Candy

Red and Orange Bell Pepper Candy

I’m sure you are trying to wrap your head around the idea of red and orange bell peppers being candy. They aren’t EXACTLY candy but they are very candy-like.

Only 2 ingredients, sweet, crunchy, healthy, full of nutrients, paleo and gluten-free. Holla!

I use red and orange bell peppers because they are naturally sweeter than the green ones. I hardly ever eat the green ones, I just prefer the flavor of the red, yellow or orange peppers better.

bell pepper red orange candy maple syrup organic vegetable fiber antioxidant dehydrate crunchy snack

Once again I used my most favorite of all kitchen appliances, my trusty dehydrator. I love this thing. I not only like it because I can make all natural snacks like my dried citrus slices, but if you are a “prepper” in any capacity, the opportunity to dry and store food is there too.

This tasty snack is not only easy but is:

  • Paleo
  • Gluten-Free
  • High in vitamin C and vitamin A
  • Contains a significant amount of vitamin B6
  • Good source of fiber
  • Low Calorie
  • Good source of lycopene (has been shown to lower risk of certain cancers)
  • Has antioxidants
  • Contain lutein (a phytonutrient that has been proven to have a protective benefit against macular degeneration)

Those are pretty impressive stats for a simple snack. That’s the way good food should be.

Because dehydrating is done at such a low temperature, the foods dried retain most of their nutrients whereas food heated at high temperatures tend to lose a lot of nutrients.

bell pepper red orange candy maple syrup organic vegetable fiber antioxidant dehydrate crunchy snack

Such a simple recipe packed with nutritional value. I can easily eat 2 bell peppers in one snacking episode. That’s a lot of nutrition in a crunchy sweet treat. Now that’s MY kind of snack.

I only had 2 bell peppers to use but my dehydrator could have easily dried 6 which would have given me a lot more snack inventory. You can adjust the recipe very easily to make as much as you would like.

If you have a lot of little hands in the house, make as many as you can because they are addicting and they will go fast.

Red and Orange Bell Pepper Candy
 
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Red and Orange Bell Pepper Candy
Author:
Recipe type: Snack, Paleo, Vegan, Gluten-Free
Serves: 1
Ingredients
  • 1 organic red bell pepper
  • 1 organic orange bell pepper
  • 3 tablespoons organic maple syrup
Instructions
  1. Wash bell peppers and slice into strips about ⅓ to ¼ inch.
  2. Place sliced peppers in a dish and pour maple syrup over it. Massage syrup into pepper strips.
  3. Cover and marinate in fridge for a couple of hours.
  4. Place strips on dehydrator trays without them touching each other and set temperature to 125 degrees for 24 hours.
  5. Check on them after about 20 hours by taking one out and letting it cool to see how dry it is. They should be crunchy and brittle, enough that someone else can hear it when you eat it. If they are not dried enough, the moisture trapped inside can go rancid so you want to make sure they are good and dried.
  6. If they aren't all the way dried, continue drying for as long as necessary. Mine took the whole 24 hours.

 

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Sumo Citrus – The Ugly Orange

Sumo Citrus – The Ugly Orange

On my latest trip to Whole Foods I was browsing the produce area and saw this ugly bumpy looking orange with a little knob on the top. I had to find out what it was.

(They are only in season Feb through May)

sumo orange citrus fruit sweet japan california tangerine clementine hybrid mandarin

Here is another example of not judging a book by it’s cover because this is the most deliciously sweet mandarin orange I’ve ever tasted. I originally bought them for my hubby to try because he loves oranges but after I had a section of it, I was in love too.

Not only are these delicious but they are the perfect “to-go” snack because they are so easy to peel that a small child can do it, there will be no drippy sticky hands and they are seedless.

To test for the best tasting Sumo, I give them a little squeeze. Gently squeeze, if it “gives” a little, it means it’s at its optimum taste and ready to eat.

I needed to find out the stats on this incredible fruit. I found Sumocitrus.com where they explain it all.

Grown in California’s Central Valley to the same exacting standards of the original Kumamoto farmer. It is the biggest mandarin you’ve ever seen. It has a distinctive shape with a prominent “top-knot.” The peel is bright orange, bumpy and loose so it peels effortlessly. The delicate sections separate easily. It’s seedless, juicy without being messy, and it is quite probably the sweetest citrus you’ll ever eat.

sumo orange citrus fruit sweet japan california tangerine clementine hybrid mandarin seedless vitamin

Size & Appearance

  • Easy to identify with the unique shape, bumpy rind and knob on the top that we like to call the SUMO’s ‘top-knot.’
  • Handle with care – Don’t let the rough exterior fool you. While the fruit looks tough and indestructible on the outside, it is somewhat delicate.
  • Gently squeeze, if it “gives” a little, it means it’s at its optimum taste and ready 
    to eat

Easy to Peel

  • One-piece peel – The SUMO’s ‘top-knot’ makes the fruit fun and easy to peel.
  • The bumpy and loose rind is characteristic of the variety and contributes to the easy peeling.
  • “Eat in the Car Test” — Unlike other citrus varieties, SUMO CITRUS® is ‘neat’ meaning no sticky mess, and hands stay dry.
  • SUMO CITRUS® has very little albedo or rag (the white part of citrus), allowing the fruit to section easily with less of the white “netting” sticking to the fruit.

Get your hands on a Sumo Citrus before they are out of season. They are available February thru May so you still have a couple of months to enjoy them.  Your mouth will thank you.

 

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